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Log In / Register | Nov 23, 2014

US Hotel Supply Growth Looks Positive

Hospitality experts gathered during the Hotel Data Conference in September. Hotel News Now reports that experts agree that hotel oversupply would not be an issue.

Trends in Hotel Franchise Fees, The Numbers

US hotels' franchise related fees as a percentage of rooms revenue from 2007 - 2013Hotel franchise companies ("the brands/chains") charge their franchisees a series of fees that cover a variety of services provided by the franchisor.

Approaching the Top, Benefits the Bottom

Much has been written about the strong top-line performance of the U.S. lodging industry since the Great Recession. According to STR, Inc, national occupancy levels increased from 54.5 percent in 2009 to 62.2 percent in 2013, while average daily room rates grew from $98.21 to $110.34.

The Components of Hotel Labor Costs

Change in Avg Hourly Compensation vs UnemploymentLabor and related costs have long been the single expense category in operating a hotel.

Meeting Planners Are Positive For 2013

2013 vs 2012 Hotel Room RatesStrong gains in transient demand have led the U.S. lodging industry out of the depths of the 2008/2009 industry recession.

2013 Economic Scenarios for Hospitality

Mark Woodworth, president of PKF Hospitality Research, discusses the state of the U.S. lodging industry. He forecasts what could happen to RevPAR if the U.S. falls off the fiscal cliff. Hint: It's not pretty.

Hotel Managers Nailed Their Budgets In 2011

In the fall of 2010 when U.S. hotel managers were preparing their budgets for 2011, most industry participants were pleasantly surprised at the strong pace of the recovery in lodging demand.

Good News, U.S. Hotel Profit Recovery

According to the new PKF Trends survey, the U.S. lodging industry produced a 12.7% profit growth in 2011.  80.5% of participating hotels enjoyed an increase in total revenue while 72.3% achieved growth in profits. 

Giving And Taking Credit

From 2008 and 2009, the average U.S. hotel suffered a 13.2 percent decline in occupancy along with a 5.9 percent drop in average daily rate (ADR).

Locals Up, Lounges Down

In past articles, PKF Hospitality Research (PKF-HR) has labeled the period 2000 to 2010 as the "lost decade" for the U.S. lodging industry. During this volatile period, hotel revenues remained virtually flat through two major recessions and one extended period of prosperity.