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Log In / Register | Apr 18, 2014

Best index for biz trends (BMM should post it)

5 Comments

Paul Steinberg's picture

Inflation & Deflation at same time?

An interesting idea being floated is that there may be a split trend developing.

Commodities traded globally are starting to show inflationary pressure, while US domestic indicators (such as hourly wages) are showing deflation.

Some folks are saying this could be a trend, but others say this is just incipient stagflation such as we saw in the Carter years.

michael webster's picture

Stagflation

So having no money to buy sugar filled "food products" is a bad thing?

Paul Steinberg's picture

Why we drink Coca Cola from Mexico

Webster wrote:

So having no money to buy sugar filled "food products" is a bad thing?

Being from the less-developed North Country, you might not be aware that here in the United States we have a proud tradition of having "the best democracy money can buy."

As a result, we don't have much in the way of sugar-filled options here.

One of the largest political contributors is the Fanjul family, which spends millions of dollars each year buying up Republicans and Democrats--a truly bi-partisan bribery scheme which results in American food processors being unable to afford to use sugar, but the Fanjul family gets a healthy return on the Fanjul's purchase of politicians-- to the tune of a hundred million dollars a year in taxpayer money.

Family patriarch Alfonso Fanjul achieved some notoriety when Monica Lewinsky said that President Clinton interrupted a --ahem, "meeting"-- with Lewinsky because Fanjul demanded that his de facto employee (the President of the United States) "come" to the phone immediately.

In any event, the only way to get genuine sugar in your Coca-Cola is either to wait for "Passover Coke" or to import it from Mexico. It is a measure of the dire straits which the United States consumer exists that now major chains such as Costco Wholesale import Coca-Cola from Mexico and sell it at a mark-up to american consumers.

michael webster's picture

Sugar=Corn Syrup

I should have been more precise: why is it a bad thing that Americans can no longer afford to buy "food products enhanced" with corn syrup?  (Assuming that corn is one of the commodities on the rise?)

Paul Steinberg's picture

Oh, to be a Canuck

Only someone in a country which still makes Coca-Cola with real sugar could equate that product with the corn syrup glop used here in the United States.