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So You Want to Franchise Your Business

Harold Kestenbaum has become an icon in franchising over the past 30 years in working with 100-plus companies in perfecting their franchise models, legally and otherwise. Now he has teamed up with award-winning journalist Adina M. Genn to give would-be franchisors a roadmap on how to maneuver the tricky path through the franchising process. But So You Want to Franchise Your Business is more than a how-to book for those seeking advice on the basics. It is also a refresher course for seasoned veterans and is a must-read for franchisees who want to understand more about the industry.

This thought-provoking book is written in a refreshing easy-to-read style, which is unexpected since authored by a skilled franchise attorney. But even with its friendly format and interesting profiles of key industry leaders, don’t be fooled. It is also packed with valuable, prudent information. The authors don’t pull any punches in giving expert advice on tackling some of franchising’s most critical issues, everything from dealing with recalcitrant franchisees to creating exit strategies, opening avenues of going public and dealing with private equity firms.

In writing the book, Kestenbaum and Genn solicited input from a variety of franchisors including Jenny Craig, 1-800-Got-Junk?, PostNet and Hollywood Tans. Anecdotes from Rhonda Sanderson, Sanderson & Associates, and Subway president and co-founder Fred DeLuca, are also infused throughout the book. DeLuca, a longtime friend of Kestenbaum’s, penned the book’s forward as well.

“Through this first-hand advice, we’re able to offer an honest look at what it takes to be a successful franchisor, which should benefit those readers that think franchising may be an easy ticket to big bucks,” Genn said of the book. “While big profits can certainly be a worthwhile end goal, a franchisor will work hard for every penny and we demonstrate why,” she added. Genn said the fact of the matter is that some prospective franchisors may actually read it and decide not to franchise, thus saving themselves time and money.

Kestenbaum agrees. “Franchising isn’t for everyone. Adina and I want to help our readers realize whether it’s the right avenue to pursue or if another would better suit their ultimate goals.”

 

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