The Triumph of Public Relations

<p>
In February 2011, I reported that 50 new hotel brands had been announced in the past six months, adding to the 100+ already in existence. I wondered if the announcement of these new brands was the triumph of public relations over common sense.</p>
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<p>
<b>Here are seven more new brand announcements:<br />
</b></p>
<ol>
<li>
Kerry by Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts</li>
<li>
Chapter by Swire Hotels</li>
<li>
Qube</li>
<li>
Dukes by Seven Tides</li>
<li>
Nobu</li>
<li>
Missoni by Rezidor</li>
<li>
Ayala&nbsp;</li>
</ol>
<p>
Meanwhile, Otus Analytics, a division of the investment bank Otus &amp; Co. has recently issued their 2011 edition of Hotel Chains in Europe 2011. The full report runs to almost 500 pages covering nearly 900 brands and 15,300 hotels in Europe, most quite small.</p>
<p>
A free 20-page summary is available from <a href="http://www%[email protected]/">[email protected]</a&gt;. The European market is dominated by Accor which has more than 250,000 rooms and four of the top brands. But behind Accor are another seven hundred companies, each with at least four hotels and almost nine hundred brands:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p>
<strong>Top 10 brands in Europe at end of 2010&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong></p>
<table border="1" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="2" style="width: 231px; height: 330px;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="97">
<strong>Brand</strong></td>
<td valign="top" width="48">
<strong>Hotels</strong></td>
<td valign="top" width="73">
<strong>Rooms</strong></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="100">
Ibis</td>
<td valign="top" width="53">
709</td>
<td valign="top" width="74">
75,460</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="98">
Mercure</td>
<td valign="top" width="57">
474</td>
<td valign="top" width="74">
54,032</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="97">
Holiday Inn</td>
<td valign="top" width="60">
277</td>
<td valign="top" width="73">
45,526</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="95">
Novotel</td>
<td valign="top" width="62">
265</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
43,420</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="95">
Premier Inn</td>
<td valign="top" width="63">
586</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
42,809</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="94">
NH Hotels</td>
<td valign="top" width="64">
275</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
41,213</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="94">
Hilton</td>
<td valign="top" width="64">
152</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
39,594</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="94">
Radisson Blu</td>
<td valign="top" width="64">
172</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
38,740</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="94">
Etap</td>
<td valign="top" width="64">
421</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
35,691</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td valign="top" width="94">
Travelodge</td>
<td valign="top" width="64">
458</td>
<td valign="top" width="72">
29,775</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<hr />
<p>
<span style="font-size:9px;">Stanley Turkel, CMHS, ISHC recently published his new book, <i>Great American Hoteliers: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry</i>. It contains 359 pages, 25 illustrations and 16 chapters. It also has a foreword (by Stephen Rushmore), preface, introduction, bibliography and index.</span></p>
<p>
<span style="font-size:9px;">Ed Watkins, Editor of <u>Lodging Hospitality</u> wrote, &ldquo;The lodging industry typically doesn&rsquo;t spend a lot of time considering its past. Some may find that odd since compared to many other businesses (computers, automobiles aircraft), the hotel business is one of oldest if not the oldest, in the history of man. That changed recently with the publication of.... <i>Great American Hoteliers: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry</i>, a fascinating and entertaining series of profiles of 16 men who author Stanley Turkel argues were the builders of the modern American hotel industry. That&rsquo;s significant because due to the efforts of these titans (and others, of course), the American style of hotelkeeping long surpassed the European tradition that reigned for centuries.</span></p>
<p>
<span style="font-size:9px;">Some of the profiles contain cover names (Hilton, Marriott, Johnson, Wilson) familiar to even casual students of hotel or U.S. history. Sadly, just one of the pioneers covered the book (John Q. Hammons) is still alive and active in the industry. To me, the more interesting tales cover hoteliers about whom I knew little before reading his book but now have a greater appreciation for their contributions.</span></p>
<p>
<span style="font-size:9px;">The most compelling story focuses on Kanjibhai Manchhubhai Patel who Turkel identifies as the first Indian-American hotelier. K.M. Patel arrived in San Francisco in 1923 and soon began operating a small residential hotel in the city. The rest, as they say, is history; Today, Indian-American hoteliers dominate the industry with their trade association, AAHOA, recently surpassing 10,000 members. As Turkel says, this community represents a true American success story.</span></p>
<p>
<span style="font-size:9px;">To order the book, go to <a href="http://www.greatamericanhoteliers.com/">www.greatamericanhoteliers.com<…;. I heartily recommend it.&rdquo;</span></p>

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