Smashburger Sees Franchisees as Investors, Not Revenue Stream

Inside a Smashburger in Kentucky
Being served as customer #27 inside a Kentucky Smashburger, photo/bmm

In a recent interview, Tom Ryan, founder and chief concept officer of the Smashburger chain shared his experiences in building his own “better burger” empire after hitting the 100th store mark last April.

  One bit of advice he shared with peers,

We've learned and adopted the value of looking at franchise partners as investors, instead of as a revenue stream. It's a big mistake that a lot of the older chains have made. We are actually partners  [in the true sense] with our franchise partners. We call it One Smashburger!

In talking with Quick Serve Leader, Ryan said while the industry was focused on Five Guys Burger’s exponential growth across America, his Denver-based chain was looking at places like St. Louis, Jacksonville, Atlanta and Charlotte. He said each store has opened up to an incredible amount of local hype and buzz.

Ryan feels their Smashburger team energy comes from their goal in serving customers, 

Smashburger's goal is to put fresh, hand-crafted burgers back into people's lives. People have always loved burgers, but the industry has not been giving people burgers in a fresh and modern way, in terms of food and experience.

Ryan said tapping into that unmet demand is hugely energizing. Just because the burger market is saturated and there are a lot of players, doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot of opportunity. Smashburger plans to open 500 stores in late 2013.

The company’s founder said part of Smashburger’s success has been related to their organizational structure. Ryan explained,

We have a tremendously diverse set of people. We are really focused on bringing in really strong, industry-focused expertise, and matching those with very, very strong analytical business types.


Article:  Smashburger Founder Talks Buzz Marketing, Being Unique, Leadership Lessons

And where did they learn this

And where did they learn this behavior? When they learned it why didn't they apply that philosophy for the sake of the thousands of "investors" in quiznos?

Posted by Guest 3 on September 8th, 2011

I don't believe this article.

Once someone taste fast money, they will not settle for anything else.  Once a thief, always a thief.  Just because they say they will view their zee's as partners, does not mean they will do it.  They will pick two or three zee's to be their example of success.  They will screw as many people as they can.  They did with Q and 123 Fit. 

on September 9th, 2011

Jeez, Barb - lighten up, OK - it's Friday and the weekend is

coming up.

You can't just wallow in abject sadness forever, Some sarcastic humor once a day or so is a necessary contrapuntal rythm.

In the natural order of things, just as God created them, there are predators and prey. Why would you think it would be any different amongst humans than it is amongst the other creatures of nature? It isn't. There are penalties for not being strong and cunning. Even monkeys use tools. Why not people? If you showed up to an investment fest inadequately equipped and lost everything, you are at least partly at fault. Had you insisted upon doing things in reality mode, you would have showed up with some adequate weapon to deal with it.

Bob's gallows humor is a welcome relief.

Posted by RichardSolomon on September 9th, 2011

I like Bob. He does make me laugh.

The reality behind it is not funny.  I did laugh at it because the truth behind it. 

The truth behind this is if you are not the one who gets hurt, it is easy to say, "Get over it."  When one gets hurt big time it takes years to get over.  It hurts real people who have to survive.  Our only fault was trusting that this corporation was on our side.  It doesn't make sense that a zor would purposely hurt their zees.  I don't think like a crook.        

on September 9th, 2011

Wallowing in self pity is not going to help anyone.

 It is healthy for people to put the past behind them and to begin living again. The Lord gives us one life to live and living in the past is no life to live. Strong people survive and move forward, and the weak wallow in the failures of time's past and never heal.

There are plenty of idiots to buy the trash no matter what is said here. You would be surprised how many morons out there just buy a franchise with no due diligence; all rooted in emotion and then expect the governement to protect them from themselves. There are people out there with zero common sense.

Richard is right, you need to lighten up.

Posted by Big Tex on September 9th, 2011

Who is living in the past?

I am in the present.  I am still dealing with problems caused by getting fleeced.  I know once we start not experiencing the consequences of making the worst decision we have made as a couple, I will move forward.  It takes years to get your good credit back, years to except the huge lost.  Having to go from established to struggeling is a huge thing to adapt to.  I am dealing with it one day at a time.  I comment so other's will thing twice before signing on the dotted line.  Hopefully they will move slow and pick a honorable zor who will not fleece them. 

I had to make sad decisions in the past month or so.  Still dealing with lost of financial establishment is a hard thing to go through.  One day at a time.  I do believe there will be a day that It will be the past and not the present.  We are going on our fifth year.  Big price to pay for signing on the dotted line. 

on September 10th, 2011

Barbara, you want to do some good?

Take the Bill of Rights and edit it to become a list of suggestions and educational material to examining a franchise. You might even get Darnelle to help you. Take it along with signature pages to UPS stores, Quiznos, Cold Stone, and other franchise owners in your area and ask them to collect signatures of registered voters. The franchisees should get thousands of signatures. Then take it to your state representative and tell him that you have umpteen thousands of signatures of voters in his district who want him to propose that this information become part of the state disclosure process. I will bet that you have a better than 50% chance of improving your states disclosure process. Become activists and leave the pity party in the dust. This way you can say you have really done something for your state. Quit whining and make something happen.

Posted by Big Tex on September 10th, 2011

Franchisee Bill of Rights

Ummm...isn't what you suggested exactly what the draftees of the Universal Franchisee Bill of Right from the CFA advocate? Read the bill or rights and compare the CFA Bill of Rights against what someone is trying to sell to you verbally says, and then what the words on the papers you are asked to sign say?

Posted by Guest on September 10th, 2011

not to my knowledge

Regulation at the federal level is hopeless, and the federal government should not get involved in state matters. I am proposing education in the disclosure process (state by state) and not regulation. Who can argue against education? Regulation is ludicrous. It won't fly. Not going to happen. Remember...you heard it here first.

People holding out for federal regulation are deluded; especially with the Tea Party movement and with Romney or Perry likely to overtake Obama.....AND in this economy...Forget it.  Even Obama is talking about eliminating regulation to jump start the economy.

The regulation hawks are FOOLS. Besides, regulation doesn't stop fraud, AND it creates false confidence in the sales process. When are you people going to get it? 

Write a pamphlet that educates the buyer on the same points the CFA BOR states and get it in each state's disclosure process. How can a politician be against this even in the face of the IFA? IT'S NOT REGULATION!

All of you people wanting Uncle Sambo to pass regulation that will never happen in the face of a well funded and organized IFA (and constitution minded people) are pissing away valuable time by not taking a two pronged approach. The regulation approach is hopeless; so you might as well have a backup plan that involves state education.

Why is this so hard to grasp? You people are trying to eat an elephant in one bite. You eat it ONE BITE AT A TIME and take the tenderest parts first. Jeez.

Posted by Big Tex on September 10th, 2011

Your knowledge of the CFA BIll of Rights

Seems flawed. It isn't federal legislation. It is a bullet point list of problems that arise inn franchise relationships that typically lead to a Franchisee's financial ruin, but which are all specifically allowed to happen under franchise agreements.

People are supposed to read it, and learn. It. Isn't being filed in Congress. It is being distributed by franchisee associations to members and people who inquire about being franchisees in a system. I think that the CFA and you are on the same page.

This is where reform needs to start: with people being educated about big, but very complex and nuanced decisions that they are being seduced and induced to make.

Posted by Guest on September 10th, 2011

Well, What about systems that have no associations?

Distributed by whom? The franchiser? Please. Maybe a handfull who have nothing to worry about getting this info out, but what about the others? Getting it built into state disclosure process as education seems much more effective in reaching everyone. Wouldn't you agree?

Posted by Big Tex on September 10th, 2011

State Disclosure Is Where It Should Begin...

The CFA members I've spoken with initially hoped the FUBOR would be drafted into some sort of Federal legislation. As it as has been discussed, on BMM, the hopes of getting FUBOR passed into legislation are quickly fading.

Prospective franchisees will usually take the time, and perhaps, spend some money to understand their state's franchise statues. Having franchisors disclose their FA's against FUBOR at the state level would be an effective tool to weed out franchise shysters.

Federal regulation only creates a false sense of security for prospective franchisees. When was the last time the FTC pursued action against a franchisor? However, every prospect hears, "we are regulated by the FTC."

Smacking a franchisor at the State level sets an example for others to clean up their acts.

Posted by Jone McI on September 11th, 2011

If you are talking about state legislation

Good luck there too. Forget legislation. Create a franchisee due diligence guide and get that adopted state by state. There is not one single representative who can say with a straight face that educational material is a bad idea and any franchiser who argues against it will only look like shysters. How could the IFA argue against this with a straight face. Can you see them, "Uh, we don't like education. It's not good for business."

Someone needs to create a brief guide, post it here, and let's get some feedback from the community. If the guide were tied to an organization then the guide could be updated easily. Perhaps have the states adopt the Franchisee Education Guide or Muldoon's Education Arsenal. This way when the guide is updated it gets updated annually with each state. This is the best shot  to improve franchising in America. Also, lose the "Bill of Rights" lingo. It needs to be about "Education".

Posted by Big Tex on September 11th, 2011

The problem is too many people think "bad business"

is good business.  We need to go back to the "Golden Rule."  Bad business is when you lie, steal and cheat to get ahead.  Hurting thousands to become billionares is terrible.  Families hurt to the point where they can't afford heat in the winter and decent meals.  I can go on and on.  We need to have a win, win mentality or our country will continue to go down hill.  The more money people make the more money people will spend on going out to eat, buying clothes and going on vacations.  Stimulating the economy.  Our economy is sick.  People with no money will not be able to do anything.  When people don't spend the economy will crash one day.  No one will make any money.    

on September 11th, 2011

Barbara, you actually hurt the discussion

with your emotional ridiculousness. You've got more estrogen than a feedlot heifer. I sware to God if your brain were in a bumble bee it would fly backwards.

Golder Rule? Jesus H. Christ. Are you for real? Where the hell is Spuddie Pie and his ten cent franchises?

Posted by Big Tex on September 11th, 2011

The CFA Franchisee Bill of Rights

Funny, I see it exactly as a basic due diligence guide for the uninitiated, whether to use to weigh their franchise agreements, or, even better, their own attorneys when the " look over" the contract for them. If you don't know which questions to ask, you will never get the answers that you need. This document by far doesn't list all of the questions that a franchise buyer needs to ask, and certainly has no guidance on business models at all, but it is very good place to start. I tend to agree that legislation, especially at the federal level, is a paper tiger even if it gets ever gets enacted. The states are a better place to do it, but even there enforcement is an issue. There are all kinds of laws against a lot of things, but they don't seem to deter anyone that plans on breaking them from doing it. The overcrowded jails are all the evidence that you need of that.

Posted by Barristerista on September 11th, 2011

Re: Talking about state legislation

"Forget legislation. Create a franchisee due diligence guide and get that adopted state by state. There is not one single representative who can say with a straight face that educational material is a bad idea and any franchiser who argues against it will only look like shysters."

Tex, my main reservation with this line of thought is there are no (as in ZERO) repercussions for the fraudulent act.  I am not saying educating the public is a bad idea but to stop (or at least curtail) negative behavior there must be consequences.  Are banks still robbed?  Yes, but there would be a hell of a lot more robbed if there were no laws to punish the act and, rather, just a "pamphlet" handed out to banks on what they should do to protect themselves.  That goes for rape, murder etc.  Regulations may not stop the act completely but it DOES act as a deterrent or more acts of violence would be occurring.

Lastly, I don't know your agenda - but lets be honest, we all have one.  But your constant drumbeating of the "no legislation" theme makes one question just what your goal is.  Will enacting legislation be difficult?  Of course.  But if one were to stop trying just because it is difficult and, instead, focus on your idea well, you might as well just let franchisors continue to ride roughshod over everyone.  The "education" pamphlet will be overridden a thousand times over by the excellent, and well funded, marketing of franchising. 

on September 11th, 2011

State legislation

True, at least bank robbers planning to break the " Absolutely No Bank Robbing, Ever! this Means You!" law actually wear masks and run away to hide after they do it.

Quiznos and Coldstone Creamery?

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

"Few people are capable of

"Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions.Albert Einstein

OS, did the regulation on the books help you? Did you have a degree of false confidence? I bet so.

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them." Albert Einstein

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex... It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." Albert Einstein

Tex, my main reservation with this line of thought is there are no (as in ZERO) repercussions for the fraudulent act. Oldsword

Oldsword, if one can prevent the problem then you won't need to punish repercussions. Regulation will never happen; so you people might as well hedge your bets and have a multi pronged approach involving education at the state disclosure process.

Oldsword, I have no agenda other than to offer my opinion to give free advice to those seeking to improve franchising. I am very familiar with the political arena, and I know some substantial players. I also know that the federal regulation you seek will not happen in the next 10 years if ever. You have to start at the state level, and start there.

The elephant you seek to swallow in one bite is too big and too tough. Start with education at the state level. This will increase awareness with the prospective franchisees and state regulators. Then work to state regulation. Your approach is FLAWED at the core. It will never work and while you waste valuable time pissing in the wind much could have been done.

Oldsword, you have a large degree of emotion invested in your position. Focusing on punishment rather than focusing on improvement is clear in your position. I opine that it is far better to change franchising at the disclosure process than to ignore that path and focus on the aftermath. You strategy will not necessarily reduce the number of victims.

"Education always pays the best dividend" Benjamin Franklin


Posted by Big Tex on September 11th, 2011

Don't need no stinkin' law

Heys. I tought real Texans don't quote Einstein to make their point. They quote Jesus.

I agree wit what Tex and da kitten says. If youse want people to stop at a stop light, yous need to educate 'em on da dangers of running a red light. We're all grown ups. We don't need no stinkin' law against red lights. Too much gov't. Dat reminds me, I gotta call da mayor.

"Prohibition has made nothing but trouble" - Al Capone

on September 11th, 2011

Prohibition Laws created the rise of the mob.

and the Cartels on out borders and in our cities. I will leave the biblical quotes to Barbara. The golden rule doesn't work so swell in business these days.  Are you really Ray? I thought you were the admin or Oldsword.

Ever run a red light when no one was watching?  None the less, I am glad to see you agree with logic.

Posted by Big Tex on September 11th, 2011

Unbridled opportunity

I don't know about dis Ray guy but I for one aint gettin' busted over da small stuff. I drive like a friggin grandma. 'Cause here in Joisey youse never knows whose watchin'. Deys even got cameras on intersections nowsdays. Da U.S.A. has become da stinkin' U.S.S.R. Knows what I mean? Youse gotta go all da way to Nigeria to enjoy freedom nowsdays.

Tex shoots straight about how we should take out da drug laws. Prohibition created great service opportunities for the mob. Dere'd be no drug supply if dere were no demand. No stinkin' law gonna stop dat.

Tex and da cat have my vote.

"This American system of ours... call it Americanism, call it capitalism, call it what you like, gives to each and every one of us a great opportunity if we only seize it with both hands and make the most of it." - Al Capone

on September 11th, 2011

Bugsy = Ray

prior to exposing him Bugsy only came out after Ray had posted first. Bugsy only comes out when the pro regulation bunch are losing the debate. Bugsy is a distraction from the debate. Now that it was proven that Bugsy only came out in threads Ray posted on and AFTER Ray posted, Ray has changed up his M.O. and is now bring Bugsy out when Ray has not posted; this further proved my logic.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

Yous got it figured out

Okay. Yous gots me. Dat's really good of yous to figure out dat I'm Ray. I changed my name 'cause honestly, Ray is an embarrasing name.

Tex and da Guest are no eggheads. I sleep good knowin' dere's peoples like yous helpin' make franchisin' good.

on September 12th, 2011

Prohibition Laws created the

Prohibition Laws created the rise of the mob.

 

Even wrose it created the rise of the Kennedy's.

on September 12th, 2011

Rise of Kennedy and Nixon

Yep. Da cat is right again. So many laws and regulations just result in a mountain of criminals.

Not only did we bed wit da Dems but we did da Republicans too. My company is an equal opportunity employer. Knows what I mean? I mean folks don't call him Tricky Dicky for nutin'.

Gettin' da gov't to prohibit just ain't worth it.

on September 12th, 2011

I would think the Bush family

I would think the Bush family would be far dirtier than Nixon ever was. 

on September 12th, 2011

Re: Bush family

Shhh, I didn't want to leak dat. Da former first family is still a useful connection, twice over. Our smuggling division finds dese guys, let's say, cooperative.

Can't get 'em interested in helping with franchisin'. Forty-tree sniffed around but tinks its small potatoes. He doesn't understand the possibilities.

on September 12th, 2011

OldSword, for some of us the

OldSword, for some of us the agenda is simple.  I view the Government as a tyrannical power that is the greatest evil any of us are ever likely to face it our lifetime and with almost 100% certainty the greatest threat to your children's prosperity.   Therefore I want it minimized. 

Anything that gives them more power, anything that increases it size must be very carefully weighed.  I fail to see how you can ever justify creating more Government to protect people form voluntary associations.    

As I recall we have already established you would not have been burnt if there was no SBA, which is the tool empowering these frauds. 

I want to leave you and all with one more thought.  I recently ran for public office.  During that run I was contacted by more than one elected office holder and offered a way to increase my wealth by investing in several Government mandated wealth redistribution schemes.  Most of them centered around Section 8 housing.   The point is, the bait they dangle to corrupt folks, the way they control the masses and manipulate the outcomes is via the applications of resources through Government agencies.  All you will accomplish is creating more patronage jobs that have the ability to nay or say yes – that will quickly become a tool levered into campaign contributions, patronage jobs and union kickbacks.   And you will simply be creating yet another way to usurp blessed liberty from your children and grandchildren.  And for what, a desire to regulate bad behavior that is innate in human beings by using the most despicable, absolutely corruptible individuals as an enforcement mechanism.

Give it some thought.

on September 11th, 2011

That goes for rape, murder etc...Oldsaw Come on

Please, you've lost the argument when you compare commercial contract issues with crimes such as rape, murder, etc,,,

Kind of proves you to be a weak and unintelligent jerk.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

Clueless in Texas

BORING. Tex has too much of a political hobby horse running through him. Someone mentions the word CFA and Big Tex runs into a diatribe about how Uncle Sam isn't the answer when no one said it was the answer.

No one has been talking about the presidential race, the Tea Party, the FTC, federal disclosure regulation or federal franchise legislation.

Tex is dishing out advice on how to eat an elephant when the rest of us are eating grits.

Posted by Darnelle White on September 11th, 2011

Darnell, you didn't get the memo?

One goal was to get regulation passed on a federal level. Where have you been? Eating an elephant is a figure of speech. Loosten your light.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

Adding insult to injury

Loosten your light. - Guest

Loosen my light?!? Big Tex writes insulting remarks to women commenters in this thread like "you got more estrogen", "your brain were in a bumble bee" and "emotional ridculousness". To add insult to injury, an anonymous guest now condescendingly tells me to loosen my light!

I'll do no such thing.

Speaking on the subject of respect, my name is spelled with an "e" at the end.

Posted by Darnelle White on September 11th, 2011

"the real life

emotions of Barbara" Darnelle White

Well, you did invite the emotional comments. You said it first.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

So much for sensitivity

the real life emotions of Barbara" Darnelle White - Guest

Now the Guest is lumping women's names together as if we are one person! He also implies that our feelings aren't real or are unimportant.

When I ask for sensitivity in not deriding individuals who describe concepts through events that have attached feelings and emotions, I get this sort of response.

Guest, if you are married and have been wondering why you are sleeping on the couch a lot, you may want to listen to yourself to get the answer.

Posted by Darnelle White on September 11th, 2011

"Now the Guest is lumping

"Now the Guest is lumping women's names together as if we are one person!"

Not lumping anything. I think you are letting your emotions get the better of you. Barbara's arguement is emotion driven; now your's seems to be heading that way.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

What does: Loosten your

What does:

Loosten your light mean????

FuwaFuwaUsagi - who apparently can't even follow insults anymore 

 

on September 11th, 2011

It means it is so tight

It is cutting off circulation to her brain.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

It means it is so tight It

It means it is so tight

It is cutting off circulation to her brain.

A light that is so tight is cuts off circulation to the brain?   Richard, Webster, Tex, JD maybe e-mail me privately and explain this one if you get it.     Apparently I am bit slow on the uptake here.   Sorry guys I don't socialize much or watch TV or go to movies so sometimes common vernacular and pop culture eludes me.

on September 11th, 2011

she has a light strapped around her head

In her picture. It is on her head too tight.

Posted by Guest on September 11th, 2011

she has a light strapped

she has a light strapped around her head

 

LOL - oh, I just had glanced and figured she was pretending to be some sort of rag--head.   I mistook the light for a dot. 

on September 12th, 2011

Inappropriate

This is a doctor's outfit, not a man's turban.

Definition:

raghead - The rag being a turban and the head being that of a middle eastern or far eastern male. Although not all middle eastern or far eastern people wear turbans the term raghead is used in any case. It's the same as calling an Iraqi a Paki. See alse: towelhead, sand nigger, Paki, camel jockey,  - Urban dictionary

Fuwa, you mentioned that you ran for office. Using this sort of derogatory, racist language would land you in BIG trouble. If you weren't in office, that word would make sure that you'd never make it in. You, of all people, should know better. It's uncalled for here and it is most definitely not appropriate.

You need to apologize.

Posted by Darnelle White on September 12th, 2011

In the scientific community Ragheads are kown as Pullstarts.

Towelheads and Diaperheads are old terminology. The insults morph just like any other cultural or social custom.

We now have so many internationals here in Houston that the old insults are simply being forgotten. Most of the immigrants are better off than most of hte natives, so they are more often addressed simply as Sir, Maam or Boss.

Posted by RichardSolomon on September 12th, 2011

We now have so many

We now have so many internationals here in Houston that the old insults are simply being forgotten. Most of the immigrants are better off than most of hte natives, so they are more often addressed simply as Sir, Maam or Boss.

Yep, you have that right.  I am continually amazed by the immigrant community in my area.    The create their own fortune and are quick to exploit every advantage.  They avail themselves of every free handout and turn it into an entrepreneurial opportunity. The State decided that the poor need cell phone sin my are so they were handing them out left and right, by that evening you could by a "free" government cell phone in the parking lot of nearly every gas station with $25 of minutes for $15 bucks. 

They work hard and play the rules like you would not believe while the stupid 3rd and up generation Americans wallow is self pity and get fat watching TV. 

My buddy Sharyar has had an amazing journey and is now launching a tech company.  Not bad for a guy who snuck across the border from Canada by way of Iraq 20 years ago without more than $150 Canadian in his pocket. 

Alex is another example, he is an illegal who came here and started a concrete company, I met him while enjoying some tacos at the tacqueria he also started and runs in his spare time when way form his concrete contracting business. 

Manyy of the immigrants put us to shame.  They show us how to do it right and show us the weakness in our own system.  And typically we sit there and do nothing. 

on September 12th, 2011

Fuwa San, they start from need and want like Americans usually

do not know. Sometimes I feel like we are like Rome before the barbarians overran it. We are fat and lazy and feel entitled. They are skinny, fast, inventive and work circles around us. What could be more obvious than that?

We always get the most capable from every society. If they don't come as doctors and bankers at first their children will be.

I have had to try to rescue too many rich boys who didn't know which end to wipe. Tough hard working grandparents start in shirtsleeves and get rich. By the third generation the family is usually back on its rags. That third generation so frequently wastes everything because it was just handed to them. They never learnt what to do about anything in some fluffy B school.

There are times when I am certain that coming out of the Foundling Home at age ten was the best education I ever got. Street punks know how to get things done. Thank God I are one.

I don't have a lot of polish - once invited the entire legal department of 7-11 outside - and maybe you don't want your daughter bringing me home, but in a fight?

Posted by RichardSolomon on September 12th, 2011

Richard sagely

Richard sagely observes:

Fuwa San, they start from need and want like Americans usually do not know. Sometimes I feel like we are like Rome before the barbarians overran it. We are fat and lazy and feel entitled. They are skinny, fast, inventive and work circles around us. What could be more obvious than that?

My reply:

I can only agree.  I break bread with many of these folks on a regular basis.  Simply put my dad came from tough circumstances, when they were first married they lived in St Louis, no heat at all in the winter and an outhouse and a well…and that is extravagant compared where many of these folks come from.  Years ago when I backpacked through the countryside in Mexico I saw real poverty and a lot of sick stuff that people on the edge of survival do to get by. 

Richard writes:

We always get the most capable from every society. If they don't come as doctors and bankers at first their children will be.

My reply:

Hmmm, I don’t fully agree here.  I am not going to go and make blanket statements but there are some cultural sub-groups who are very content to take life a dy at a time and don’t relay have what I think we would call aspirations for their children.   But I think on the whole you are right, still and all in my community it is nothing to find 3rd and 4th generation landscapers and day laborers in a certain ethnic niche.  

Richard writes:

I have had to try to rescue too many rich boys who didn't know which end to wipe. Tough hard working grandparents start in shirtsleeves and get rich. By the third generation the family is usually back on its rags. That third generation so frequently wastes everything because it was just handed to them. They never learnt what to do about anything in some fluffy B school.

My comments;

 

In “The Millionaire Next Door” or “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Wealth”  that point is made very clear.    

 

Richard writes:

There are times when I am certain that coming out of the Foundling Home

 

My reply:

I do not understand the reference despite a ixquick (like Google only private) search; please expand.

Richard writes:

and at age ten was the best education I ever got. Street punks know how to get things done. Thank God I are one.

My reply:

LOL – I understand the sentiment.  There is something comforting when you are in a logical throw down with someone of knowing if you can’t out brain them you can kick their as or win their woman from them.  

Richard wrote:

I don't have a lot of polish - once invited the entire legal department of 7-11 outside - and maybe you don't want your daughter bringing me home, but in a fight?

My reply:

Oh I think you are pretty damned cultured – I have heard stories about your excellent taste in the finer things and appreciation of more visceral things.  But now and then, there needs to be a line drawn in the sand.  I often think the reason people don’t F with me in business is reputation. They understand legal or not, their actions might have very personal outcomes for them that no court can save them from.  

I admire your linguistic skills greatly. 

Regards...

on September 12th, 2011

The Entire 7-11 Legal Team?

"I don't have a lot of polish -once invited the entire legal department of 7-11 outside -and maybe you don't want your daughter bringing me home, but in a fight?"

Thanks for the morning laugh. I didn't realize we are similar in character. I have been called unrefined by many but my friends today, and the ones I grew up with, know who to call for a good'ole fashion throw down.

Posted by Jerry Kakaku on September 13th, 2011

It was at an ABA fall Forum on Franchising meeting in San

Antonio. At an evening soiree at a museum, the "men" of 7-11 were bragging of their victories over franchisees.

I interjected that their franchisees almost never had enough money to hire competent counsel, so ejecting one from his store using a nationally prominent law firm (since these pukes didn't know how to find a courthouse) showed them to be empty shirt bullies who rejoiced in oppressing little folks - or words to that effect.

They expressed shock that some outside lawyer to whom they always suggested they might throw some local business now and then would speak disrespectfully to them. When they were done expressing their outrage, I invited them all to the parking lot to see if any of them had any spine when confronted with an actual conflict.

They moved off to another part of the building.

Posted by RichardSolomon on September 13th, 2011

You need to apologize. And

You need to apologize.

And I think we all know what you need. 

 

 

 

on September 12th, 2011

Re: Apologizing (You guys consider yourself MEN?)

I've been reading some of these posts - especially those targeted to the women in this forum.  I can understand leveling attacks at me though I would prefer them to actually include facts.  BUT, to read what are totally disgraceful comments and to see that some are posted by those once held in high regard on this website is beyond the pale. 

Regardless of what beliefs are held, no one should be derided in this way - and to make comments specifically to denigrate anyone of a specific gender just to make one feel "more like a man" is horrendous.  NONE OF US would tolerate that kind of language used against our wives, daughters or mothers - even if one's ancestry has shown the belief of the subservience of women.  This is damn despicable.

And Richard, you being one of the most respected and highly regarded professionals here - I would have thought you would have spoken out first to get everyone out of the gutter and focused in a more constructive manner.  

And, yes, these women ARE owed an apology - let's now see what "men" stand up and show they really are men.  You want to disagree with them then do so in a forthright and factual way. 

on September 12th, 2011